Unlock Your Head

Day dream keys Illustration
Another piece for my Psychology of Perception class, it’s really weird at the beginning and trying to figure out how to start but I’m fond of how it came out =)
Inspiration from Charles Gilbert’s, All is Vanity.

Another piece for my Psychology of Perception class, it’s really weird at the beginning and trying to figure out how to start but I’m fond of how it came out =)

Inspiration from Charles Gilbert’s, All is Vanity.

(Source: daydreamkeys)

I haven’t really been posting all too much, so here’s a peak at my WIPs. 

I haven’t really been posting all too much, so here’s a peak at my WIPs. 

(Source: daydreamkeys)

Shadow art, for my Psychology of Perception class. I’m going to have play around with this again someday! It’s very interesting process and a lot of artists out there can manipulate shadow in the most fascinating ways…

Check out Ted Noble and Sue Webster, Kumi Yamashita, and Larry Kagan if you find yourself interested in this type of art!

(Source: daydreamkey)

Anonymous asked: What, in your opinion, has been the biggest effect of the internet on art?How do you get noticed in the contemporary art scene when there are so many artists on the internet and social media? With so much plagiarism and emulations of artworks, how do you keep your artworks so original? How do you make sure you style is distinct so that people know it is yours?How different is it selling art online then in a gallery? What are the main differences?What inspires you and helps you come upwith ideas?

lilpoo:

samspratt:

1-2. What, in your opinion, has been the biggest effect of the internet on art? How do you get noticed in the contemporary art scene when there are so many artists on the internet and social media?

The Internet has allowed more people to discover art, do so easier, and thus enabled more people to be and aspire to be artists — and I think that’s neato burrito. There’s no magic recipe for getting noticed because different people, different styles, and different subject matters resonate in different ways with vastly different groups of people. I once genuinely believed I had an answer to this question like a big ‘ol idiot, but that was hilariously naive as what worked for me was based on such a specific series of choices and moments. Vague answers blow but straight up lying is worse so to that I say: “I don’t know, I have a billion theories that I could talk about for days.” That said, one small aspect that I do believe helps strongly is being a real person with a name, a personality, a voice, and a face that people can like and dislike. 

3-4. With so much plagiarism and emulations of artworks, how do you keep your artworks so original? How do you make sure you style is distinct so that people know it is yours?

Well, not plagiarizing other people’s work is really the key here. While creating something wholly original from start to finish in a vacuum is always an option if you’re a witch or exist in a less interesting parallel universe, it’s not really a realistic standard nor a realistic thing that you would ever need to do — even some of the most imaginative/”original” scenes people have created are researched and remixed. More likely you have source materials — either through ideas or references, that you can choose how to handle. If you want to copy one source directly — maybe it’s a press shot, advertisement, or still created by other people — you’re obviously welcome to do that (it can even be good practice), but for whatever you make to be substantive and valuable on its own merits (mostly in regards to anyone who would hire you), or be original even though it’s not wholly so — it shouldn’t exist anywhere else in that specific form.

It should be made having referenced the source material, materials beyond that source, references created on your own, and tied together through a technical understanding and personal treatment. When I’m painting Freddie Mercury, I can’t have the majestic snowflake that is the lead singer of Queen stand in front of me, but also just copying existing photos of him would add nothing to me painting him — so I have a folder on my computer with literally hundreds of photos, both of him and not, videos of him performing or speaking, and embarrassing pictures of myself in gym shorts and leather jacket that I took after researching him and sketching out poses — all of which then contributed to me having a full enough understanding of him to paint an image of him that is very Freddie Mercury, but from the light to the pose, to the expression, the colors, the brushwork, to the composition — doesn’t exist anywhere else in any form. It’s not a masterful achievement, it’s simply effort put into making one new thing from many existing things, and years. This isn’t the only way to do things — not even close — but much like your personality is distinct in how much you understand certain areas of knowledge, your work becomes distinct through your understanding of it as well. Personality, in humans and in art, is really just your individual interpretation of knowledge. Style is often taught as a “thing” you add to your work to give it a “hook”, when more often it’s just the natural progression of us figuring out how to interpret what we know. Especially when dealing with realism, it’s a lot of work simply to make something new of old ideas, no matter how many — but it’s worth it because it can (not always, I’ve failed many times, but it can) stand on it own legs, rather than on the legs of someone else’s existing interpretation.

5-6. How different is it selling art online then in a gallery? What are the main differences?

Very. Seeing something in person as a tangible object makes people more likely to respect it and thus pay more for it. However seeing and being able to buy something online without leaving your home is both convenient, often more affordable for the consumer because it’s deemed less valuable than on a white wall (however, will then sell more of), but most importantly (and I think this is why the Internet and Art together are the bee’s knees) — art online is largely stripped of the arbitrarily pretentious vibes of the common gallery that alienate people not normally into art from buying or even just appreciating it in some form. I don’t particularly *love* galleries because they push away a large number of people who aren’t already inclined to appreciate art — they have definitely have value and purpose, but can definitely be off-putting.

7. What inspires you and helps you come up with ideas? This is literally the worst fucking art question there is — it is the soggy floor waffle of questions and everyone knows it. It’s garbage. Garbage garbage garbage. Garbage. Just awful. There is no question more vague yet with more obvious and similarly useless answers. It’s just the worst. The absolute worst. It’s not your fault either grey-face. Art education makes it seem like it’s a question that should be asked — that has meaningful responses — but it’s just the underside of a desk used by someone that constantly picks their nose. You know what you’re going to find and it’s not going to be remotely helpful. Neither was this.

Another thing about galleries is that they take a decent chunk of the profit from your sold work. Fun fun fun.

Stiles Stilinski from MTV’s Teen Wolf
An hour and a half sketch; working with photoshop on a subject you love is so much easier and more fun! <3 

Stiles Stilinski from MTV’s Teen Wolf

An hour and a half sketch; working with photoshop on a subject you love is so much easier and more fun! <3 

(Source: daydreamkeys)

Anonymous asked: Quick question: I like making characters but hate doing backgrounds. Any tips on how to make them more enjoyable? (Also your stuff is amazing by the way)

kevindart:

Hi!  Thanks!  And yes, I have tips.  First of all (and I’m not saying you do this) but backgrounds are never going to be fun if you try drawing them AFTER you’ve already drawn your characters.  It’s really the FIRST thing you need to consider because it’s like 70-90% of your entire composition!

Second - if you like drawing characters, look at the background as if it’s a character!  Everything in there can help tell the story of your characters.  What kind of environments would your characters inhabit?  What sort of props would they surround themselves with?  If they’re in a building, what is the style of the architecture?  Also, you can draw environments just as dynamically as you draw characters - with motion, emotion, personality, all of that!  The background is also one of your biggest tools for directing the viewer’s eye in your composition - it can point them exactly where they need to look!

Third - the same as you would when you’re drawing a character, don’t rely on stereotypes or icons!  Not every tree is an oak tree.  There are so many types of trees.  But you have to look for them, and study them.  Be as specific as you possibly can with everything in the environment, otherwise it will look boring and generic.

Most importantly, keep drawing and challenging yourself to try new things!  Good luck!

A 5x7 inch oil painting of my brother.

A 5x7 inch oil painting of my brother.

(Source: daydreamkeys)

    The left over cats from CTcon are now up on EtsyThe cat cards are 2”x3” and hand watercolored, each completely unique and the only one of it’s kind. There are only 9 cats, so check them out.

    On the topic of cat cards, commission cats will be an open mid December. I will be studying abroad until then so if you are interested in a custom cat, please hold off until then, at which point I will be uber excited to do one for you! =)

I’ve finally made an Etsy shop! The pendants I was selling at CTcon will be available soon, one has already been listed. Cats may soon be available too =D